Eine ueberarbeitete Version des smartctrl von Arne.
[ipfire-2.x.git] / config / postfix / transport
1 # TRANSPORT(5)                                         TRANSPORT(5)
2
3 # NAME
4 #        transport - Postfix transport table format
5
6 # SYNOPSIS
7 #        postmap /etc/postfix/transport
8
9 #        postmap -q "string" /etc/postfix/transport
10
11 #        postmap -q - /etc/postfix/transport <inputfile
12
13 # DESCRIPTION
14 #        The  optional  transport(5) table specifies a mapping from
15 #        email addresses  to  message  delivery  transports  and/or
16 #        relay hosts. The mapping is used by the trivial-rewrite(8)
17 #        daemon.
18
19 #        This mapping overrides the default routing that  is  built
20 #        into Postfix:
21
22 #        mydestination
23 #               A  list of domains that is by default delivered via
24 #               $local_transport. This also includes  domains  that
25 #               match $inet_interfaces or $proxy_interfaces.
26
27 #        virtual_mailbox_domains
28 #               A  list of domains that is by default delivered via
29 #               $virtual_transport.
30
31 #        relay_domains
32 #               A list of domains that is by default delivered  via
33 #               $relay_transport.
34
35 #        any other destination
36 #               Mail for any other destination is by default deliv-
37 #               ered via $default_transport.
38
39 #        Normally, the transport(5) table is specified  as  a  text
40 #        file  that serves as input to the postmap(1) command.  The
41 #        result, an indexed file in dbm or db format, is  used  for
42 #        fast  searching  by  the  mail system. Execute the command
43 #        "postmap /etc/postfix/transport" in order to  rebuild  the
44 #        indexed file after changing the transport table.
45
46 #        When  the  table  is provided via other means such as NIS,
47 #        LDAP or SQL, the same lookups are  done  as  for  ordinary
48 #        indexed files.
49
50 #        Alternatively,  the  table  can  be provided as a regular-
51 #        expression map where patterns are given as regular expres-
52 #        sions,  or lookups can be directed to TCP-based server. In
53 #        that case, the lookups are done in  a  slightly  different
54 #        way  as  described below under "REGULAR EXPRESSION TABLES"
55 #        and "TCP-BASED TABLES".
56
57 # TABLE FORMAT
58 #        The input format for the postmap(1) command is as follows:
59
60 #        pattern result
61 #               When  pattern  matches  the  recipient  address  or
62 #               domain, use the corresponding result.
63
64 #        blank lines and comments
65 #               Empty lines and whitespace-only lines are  ignored,
66 #               as  are  lines whose first non-whitespace character
67 #               is a `#'.
68
69 #        multi-line text
70 #               A logical line starts with non-whitespace  text.  A
71 #               line  that starts with whitespace continues a logi-
72 #               cal line.
73
74 #        The pattern specifies an email address, a domain name,  or
75 #        a  domain  name  hierarchy, as described in section "TABLE
76 #        LOOKUP".
77
78 #        The result is of the form transport:nexthop and  specifies
79 #        how or where to deliver mail. This is described in section
80 #        "RESULT FORMAT".
81
82 # TABLE SEARCH ORDER
83 #        With lookups from indexed files such as DB or DBM, or from
84 #        networked  tables  such  as NIS, LDAP or SQL, patterns are
85 #        tried in the order as listed below:
86
87 #        user+extension@domain transport:nexthop
88 #               Deliver  mail  for  user+extension@domain   through
89 #               transport to nexthop.
90
91 #        user@domain transport:nexthop
92 #               Deliver  mail  for user@domain through transport to
93 #               nexthop.
94
95 #        domain transport:nexthop
96 #               Deliver mail for domain through transport  to  nex-
97 #               thop.
98
99 #        .domain transport:nexthop
100 #               Deliver  mail  for  any subdomain of domain through
101 #               transport to nexthop. This applies  only  when  the
102 #               string  transport_maps  is  not  listed in the par-
103 #               ent_domain_matches_subdomains  configuration   set-
104 #               ting.   Otherwise, a domain name matches itself and
105 #               its subdomains.
106
107 #        Note 1: the special pattern * represents any address (i.e.
108 #        it functions as the wild-card pattern).
109
110 #        Note  2:  the  null  recipient  address  is  looked  up as
111 #        $empty_address_recipient@$myhostname (default: mailer-dae-
112 #        mon@hostname).
113
114 #        Note  3:  user@domain  or  user+extension@domain lookup is
115 #        available in Postfix 2.0 and later.
116
117 # RESULT FORMAT
118 #        The lookup result is of the form  transport:nexthop.   The
119 #        transport  field  specifies a mail delivery transport such
120 #        as smtp or local. The nexthop field  specifies  where  and
121 #        how to deliver mail.
122
123 #        The  transport field specifies the name of a mail delivery
124 #        transport (the first name of a mail delivery service entry
125 #        in the Postfix master.cf file).
126
127 #        The  interpretation  of  the  nexthop  field  is transport
128 #        dependent. In the case of SMTP, specify  a  service  on  a
129 #        non-default  port  as  host:service,  and disable MX (mail
130 #        exchanger) DNS lookups with [host] or [host]:port. The  []
131 #        form is required when you specify an IP address instead of
132 #        a hostname.
133
134 #        A null transport and null nexthop  result  means  "do  not
135 #        change":  use  the delivery transport and nexthop informa-
136 #        tion that would be used when the  entire  transport  table
137 #        did not exist.
138
139 #        A  non-null  transport  field  with  a  null nexthop field
140 #        resets the nexthop information to the recipient domain.
141
142 #        A null transport field with non-null  nexthop  field  does
143 #        not modify the transport information.
144
145 # EXAMPLES
146 #        In  order to deliver internal mail directly, while using a
147 #        mail relay for all other mail, specify a  null  entry  for
148 #        internal  destinations  (do not change the delivery trans-
149 #        port or the nexthop information) and  specify  a  wildcard
150 #        for all other destinations.
151
152 #             my.domain    :
153 #             .my.domain   :
154 #             *         smtp:outbound-relay.my.domain
155
156 #        In  order  to send mail for example.com and its subdomains
157 #        via the uucp transport to the UUCP host named example:
158
159 #             example.com      uucp:example
160 #             .example.com     uucp:example
161
162 #        When no nexthop host name is  specified,  the  destination
163 #        domain  name  is  used instead. For example, the following
164 #        directs mail for user@example.com via the  slow  transport
165 #        to  a  mail exchanger for example.com.  The slow transport
166 #        could be configured to run at most one delivery process at
167 #        a time:
168
169 #             example.com      slow:
170
171 #        When no transport is specified, Postfix uses the transport
172 #        that matches the address  domain  class  (see  DESCRIPTION
173 #        above).   The following sends all mail for example.com and
174 #        its subdomains to host gateway.example.com:
175
176 #             example.com      :[gateway.example.com]
177 #             .example.com     :[gateway.example.com]
178
179 #        In the above example, the [] suppress  MX  lookups.   This
180 #        prevents  mail  routing loops when your machine is primary
181 #        MX host for example.com.
182
183 #        In the case of delivery via SMTP, one  may  specify  host-
184 #        name:service instead of just a host:
185
186 #             example.com      smtp:bar.example:2025
187
188 #        This directs mail for user@example.com to host bar.example
189 #        port 2025. Instead of a numerical port a symbolic name may
190 #        be used. Specify [] around the hostname if MX lookups must
191 #        be disabled.
192
193 #        The error mailer can be used to bounce mail:
194
195 #             .example.com     error:mail for *.example.com is  not
196 #        deliverable
197
198 #        This  causes  all mail for user@anything.example.com to be
199 #        bounced.
200
201 # REGULAR EXPRESSION TABLES
202 #        This section describes how the table lookups  change  when
203 #        the table is given in the form of regular expressions. For
204 #        a description of regular expression lookup  table  syntax,
205 #        see regexp_table(5) or pcre_table(5).
206
207 #        Each  pattern  is  a regular expression that is applied to
208 #        the   entire    address    being    looked    up.    Thus,
209 #        some.domain.hierarchy  is  not  looked  up  via its parent
210 #        domains, nor is user+foo@domain looked up as  user@domain.
211
212 #        Patterns  are  applied  in  the  order as specified in the
213 #        table, until a pattern is found that  matches  the  search
214 #        string.
215
216 #        Results  are  the  same as with indexed file lookups, with
217 #        the additional feature that parenthesized substrings  from
218 #        the pattern can be interpolated as $1, $2 and so on.
219
220 # TCP-BASED TABLES
221 #        This  section  describes how the table lookups change when
222 #        lookups are directed to a TCP-based server. For a descrip-
223 #        tion   of  the  TCP  client/server  lookup  protocol,  see
224 #        tcp_table(5).  This feature is not  available  up  to  and
225 #        including Postfix version 2.2.
226
227 #        Each  lookup  operation  uses the entire recipient address
228 #        once.  Thus, some.domain.hierarchy is not  looked  up  via
229 #        its  parent  domains,  nor is user+foo@domain looked up as
230 #        user@domain.
231
232 #        Results are the same as with indexed file lookups.
233
234 # CONFIGURATION PARAMETERS
235 #        The following main.cf parameters are especially  relevant.
236 #        The  text  below  provides  only  a parameter summary. See
237 #        postconf(5) for more details including examples.
238
239 #        empty_address_recipient
240 #               The address that is looked up instead of  the  null
241 #               sender address.
242
243 #        parent_domain_matches_subdomains
244 #               List  of  Postfix features that use domain.tld pat-
245 #               terns  to  match  sub.domain.tld  (as  opposed   to
246 #               requiring .domain.tld patterns).
247
248 #        transport_maps
249 #               List of transport lookup tables.
250
251 # SEE ALSO
252 #        trivial-rewrite(8), rewrite and resolve addresses
253 #        postconf(5), configuration parameters
254 #        postmap(1), Postfix lookup table manager
255
256 # README FILES
257 #        Use  "postconf  readme_directory" or "postconf html_direc-
258 #        tory" to locate this information.
259 #        DATABASE_README, Postfix lookup table overview
260 #        FILTER_README, external content filter
261
262 # LICENSE
263 #        The Secure Mailer license must be  distributed  with  this
264 #        software.
265
266 # AUTHOR(S)
267 #        Wietse Venema
268 #        IBM T.J. Watson Research
269 #        P.O. Box 704
270 #        Yorktown Heights, NY 10598, USA
271
272 #                                                      TRANSPORT(5)