Default to --auto=yes
[thirdparty/mdadm.git] / mdadm.8
1 .\" -*- nroff -*-
2 ''' Copyright Neil Brown and others.
3 '''   This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
4 '''   it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
5 '''   the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or
6 '''   (at your option) any later version.
7 ''' See file COPYING in distribution for details.
8 .TH MDADM 8 "" v2.5.6
9 .SH NAME
10 mdadm \- manage MD devices
11 .I aka
12 Linux Software Raid.
13
14 .SH SYNOPSIS
15
16 .BI mdadm " [mode] <raiddevice> [options] <component-devices>"
17
18 .SH DESCRIPTION
19 RAID devices are virtual devices created from two or more
20 real block devices. This allows multiple devices (typically disk
21 drives or partitions there-of) to be combined into a single device to
22 hold (for example) a single filesystem.
23 Some RAID levels include redundancy and so can survive some degree of
24 device failure.
25
26 Linux Software RAID devices are implemented through the md (Multiple
27 Devices) device driver.
28
29 Currently, Linux supports
30 .B LINEAR
31 md devices,
32 .B RAID0
33 (striping),
34 .B RAID1
35 (mirroring),
36 .BR RAID4 ,
37 .BR RAID5 ,
38 .BR RAID6 ,
39 .BR RAID10 ,
40 .BR MULTIPATH ,
41 and
42 .BR FAULTY .
43
44 .B MULTIPATH
45 is not a Software RAID mechanism, but does involve
46 multiple devices.  For
47 .B MULTIPATH
48 each device is a path to one common physical storage device.
49
50 .B FAULTY
51 is also not true RAID, and it only involves one device.  It
52 provides a layer over a true device that can be used to inject faults.
53
54 '''.B mdadm
55 '''is a program that can be used to create, manage, and monitor
56 '''MD devices.  As
57 '''such it provides a similar set of functionality to the
58 '''.B raidtools
59 '''packages.
60 '''The key differences between
61 '''.B mdadm
62 '''and
63 '''.B raidtools
64 '''are:
65 '''.IP \(bu 4
66 '''.B mdadm
67 '''is a single program and not a collection of programs.
68 '''.IP \(bu 4
69 '''.B mdadm
70 '''can perform (almost) all of its functions without having a
71 '''configuration file and does not use one by default.  Also
72 '''.B mdadm
73 '''helps with management of the configuration
74 '''file.
75 '''.IP \(bu 4
76 '''.B mdadm
77 '''can provide information about your arrays (through Query, Detail, and Examine)
78 '''that
79 '''.B  raidtools
80 '''cannot.
81 '''.P
82 '''.I mdadm
83 '''does not use
84 '''.IR /etc/raidtab ,
85 '''the
86 '''.B raidtools
87 '''configuration file, at all.  It has a different configuration file
88 '''with a different format and a different purpose.
89
90 .SH MODES
91 mdadm has 7 major modes of operation:
92 .TP
93 .B Assemble
94 Assemble the parts of a previously created
95 array into an active array. Components can be explicitly given
96 or can be searched for.
97 .B mdadm
98 checks that the components
99 do form a bona fide array, and can, on request, fiddle superblock
100 information so as to assemble a faulty array.
101
102 .TP
103 .B Build
104 Build an array that doesn't have per-device superblocks.  For these
105 sorts of arrays,
106 .I mdadm
107 cannot differentiate between initial creation and subsequent assembly
108 of an array.  It also cannot perform any checks that appropriate
109 devices have been requested.  Because of this, the
110 .B Build
111 mode should only be used together with a complete understanding of
112 what you are doing.
113
114 .TP
115 .B Create
116 Create a new array with per-device superblocks.
117 '''It can progress
118 '''in several step create-add-add-run or it can all happen with one command.
119
120 .TP
121 .B "Follow or Monitor"
122 Monitor one or more md devices and act on any state changes.  This is
123 only meaningful for raid1, 4, 5, 6, 10 or multipath arrays as
124 only these have interesting state.  raid0 or linear never have
125 missing, spare, or failed drives, so there is nothing to monitor.
126
127 .TP
128 .B "Grow"
129 Grow (or shrink) an array, or otherwise reshape it in some way.
130 Currently supported growth options including changing the active size
131 of component devices in RAID level 1/4/5/6 and changing the number of
132 active devices in RAID1.
133
134 .TP
135 .B Manage
136 This is for doing things to specific components of an array such as
137 adding new spares and removing faulty devices.
138
139 .TP
140 .B Misc
141 This is an 'everything else' mode that supports operations on active
142 arrays, operations on component devices such as erasing old superblocks, and
143 information gathering operations.
144 '''This mode allows operations on independent devices such as examine MD
145 '''superblocks, erasing old superblocks and stopping active arrays.
146
147 .SH OPTIONS
148
149 .SH Options for selecting a mode are:
150
151 .TP
152 .BR -A ", " --assemble
153 Assemble a pre-existing array.
154
155 .TP
156 .BR -B ", " --build
157 Build a legacy array without superblocks.
158
159 .TP
160 .BR -C ", " --create
161 Create a new array.
162
163 .TP
164 .BR -F ", " --follow ", " --monitor
165 Select
166 .B Monitor
167 mode.
168
169 .TP
170 .BR -G ", " --grow
171 Change the size or shape of an active array.
172 .P
173 If a device is given before any options, or if the first option is
174 .BR --add ,
175 .BR --fail ,
176 or
177 .BR --remove ,
178 then the MANAGE mode is assume.
179 Anything other than these will cause the
180 .B Misc
181 mode to be assumed.
182
183 .SH Options that are not mode-specific are:
184
185 .TP
186 .BR -h ", " --help
187 Display general help message or, after one of the above options, a
188 mode specific help message.
189
190 .TP
191 .B --help-options
192 Display more detailed help about command line parsing and some commonly
193 used options.
194
195 .TP
196 .BR -V ", " --version
197 Print version information for mdadm.
198
199 .TP
200 .BR -v ", " --verbose
201 Be more verbose about what is happening.  This can be used twice to be
202 extra-verbose.
203 The extra verbosity currently only affects
204 .B --detail --scan
205 and
206 .BR "--examine --scan" .
207
208 .TP
209 .BR -q ", " --quiet
210 Avoid printing purely informative messages.  With this,
211 .B mdadm
212 will be silent unless there is something really important to report.
213
214 .TP
215 .BR -b ", " --brief
216 Be less verbose.  This is used with
217 .B --detail
218 and
219 .BR --examine .
220 Using
221 .B --brief
222 with
223 .B --verbose
224 gives an intermediate level of verbosity.
225
226 .TP
227 .BR -f ", " --force
228 Be more forceful about certain operations.  See the various modes of
229 the exact meaning of this option in different contexts.
230
231 .TP
232 .BR -c ", " --config=
233 Specify the config file.  Default is to use
234 .BR /etc/mdadm.conf ,
235 or if that is missing, then
236 .BR /etc/mdadm/mdadm.conf .
237 If the config file given is
238 .B partitions
239 then nothing will be read, but
240 .I mdadm
241 will act as though the config file contained exactly
242 .B "DEVICE partitions"
243 and will read
244 .B /proc/partitions
245 to find a list of devices to scan.
246 If the word
247 .B none
248 is given for the config file, then
249 .I mdadm
250 will act as though the config file were empty.
251
252 .TP
253 .BR -s ", " --scan
254 scan config file or
255 .B /proc/mdstat
256 for missing information.
257 In general, this option gives
258 .B mdadm
259 permission to get any missing information, like component devices,
260 array devices, array identities, and alert destination from the
261 configuration file:
262 .BR /etc/mdadm.conf .
263 One exception is MISC mode when using
264 .B --detail
265 or
266 .B --stop
267 in which case
268 .B --scan
269 says to get a list of array devices from
270 .BR /proc/mdstat .
271
272 .TP
273 .B -e ", " --metadata=
274 Declare the style of superblock (raid metadata) to be used.  The
275 default is 0.90 for --create, and to guess for other operations.
276 The default can be overridden by setting the
277 .B metadata
278 value for the
279 .B CREATE
280 keyword in
281 .BR mdadm.conf .
282
283 Options are:
284 .RS
285 .IP "0, 0.90, default"
286 Use the original 0.90 format superblock.  This format limits arrays to
287 28 componenet devices and limits component devices of levels 1 and
288 greater to 2 terabytes.
289 .IP "1, 1.0, 1.1, 1.2"
290 Use the new version-1 format superblock.  This has few restrictions.
291 The different subversion store the superblock at different locations
292 on the device, either at the end (for 1.0), at the start (for 1.1) or
293 4K from the start (for 1.2).
294 .RE
295
296 .TP
297 .B --homehost=
298 This will over-ride any
299 .B HOMEHOST
300 setting in the config file and provides the identify of the host which
301 should be considered the home for any arrays.
302
303 When creating an array, the
304 .B homehost
305 will be recorded in the superblock.  For version-1 superblocks, it will
306 be prefixed to the array name.  For version-0.90 superblocks part of
307 the SHA1 hash of the hostname will be stored in the later half of the
308 UUID.
309
310 When reporting information about an array, any array which is tagged
311 for the given homehost will be reported as such.
312
313 When using Auto-Assemble, only arrays tagged for the given homehost
314 will be assembled.
315
316 .SH For create, build, or grow:
317
318 .TP
319 .BR -n ", " --raid-devices=
320 Specify the number of active devices in the array.  This, plus the
321 number of spare devices (see below) must equal the number of
322 .I component-devices
323 (including "\fBmissing\fP" devices)
324 that are listed on the command line for
325 .BR  --create .
326 Setting a value of 1 is probably
327 a mistake and so requires that
328 .B --force
329 be specified first.  A value of 1 will then be allowed for linear,
330 multipath, raid0 and raid1.  It is never allowed for raid4 or raid5.
331 .br
332 This number can only be changed using
333 .B --grow
334 for RAID1 arrays, and only on kernels which provide necessary support.
335
336 .TP
337 .BR -x ", " --spare-devices=
338 Specify the number of spare (eXtra) devices in the initial array.
339 Spares can also be added
340 and removed later.  The number of component devices listed
341 on the command line must equal the number of raid devices plus the
342 number of spare devices.
343
344
345 .TP
346 .BR -z ", " --size=
347 Amount (in Kibibytes) of space to use from each drive in RAID1/4/5/6.
348 This must be a multiple of the chunk size, and must leave about 128Kb
349 of space at the end of the drive for the RAID superblock.
350 If this is not specified
351 (as it normally is not) the smallest drive (or partition) sets the
352 size, though if there is a variance among the drives of greater than 1%, a warning is
353 issued.
354
355 This value can be set with
356 .B --grow
357 for RAID level 1/4/5/6. If the array was created with a size smaller
358 than the currently active drives, the extra space can be accessed
359 using
360 .BR --grow .
361 The size can be given as
362 .B max
363 which means to choose the largest size that fits on all current drives.
364
365 .TP
366 .BR -c ", " --chunk=
367 Specify chunk size of kibibytes.  The default is 64.
368
369 .TP
370 .BR --rounding=
371 Specify rounding factor for linear array (==chunk size)
372
373 .TP
374 .BR -l ", " --level=
375 Set raid level.  When used with
376 .IR --create ,
377 options are: linear, raid0, 0, stripe, raid1, 1, mirror, raid4, 4,
378 raid5, 5, raid6, 6, raid10, 10, multipath, mp, faulty.  Obviously some of these are synonymous.
379
380 When used with
381 .IR --build ,
382 only linear, stripe, raid0, 0, raid1, multipath, mp, and faulty are valid.
383
384 Not yet supported with
385 .IR --grow .
386
387 .TP
388 .BR -p ", " --layout=
389 This option configures the fine details of data layout for raid5,
390 and raid10 arrays, and controls the failure modes for
391 .IR faulty .
392
393 The layout of the raid5 parity block can be one of
394 left-asymmetric,
395 left-symmetric,
396 right-asymmetric,
397 right-symmetric,
398 la, ra, ls, rs.  The default is left-symmetric.
399
400 When setting the failure mode for
401 .I faulty
402 the options are:
403 write-transient,
404 wt,
405 read-transient,
406 rt,
407 write-persistent,
408 wp,
409 read-persistent,
410 rp,
411 write-all,
412 read-fixable,
413 rf,
414 clear,
415 flush,
416 none.
417
418 Each mode can be followed by a number which is used as a period
419 between fault generation.  Without a number, the fault is generated
420 once on the first relevant request.  With a number, the fault will be
421 generated after that many request, and will continue to be generated
422 every time the period elapses.
423
424 Multiple failure modes can be current simultaneously by using the
425 "--grow" option to set subsequent failure modes.
426
427 "clear" or "none" will remove any pending or periodic failure modes,
428 and "flush" will clear any persistent faults.
429
430 To set the parity with "--grow", the level of the array ("faulty")
431 must be specified before the fault mode is specified.
432
433 Finally, the layout options for RAID10 are one of 'n', 'o' or 'p' followed
434 by a small number.  The default is 'n2'.
435
436 .I n
437 signals 'near' copies. Multiple copies of one data block are at
438 similar offsets in different devices.
439
440 .I o
441 signals 'offset' copies.  Rather than the chunks being duplicated
442 within a stripe, whole stripes are duplicated but are rotated by one
443 device so duplicate blocks are on different devices.  Thus subsequent
444 copies of a block are in the next drive, and are one chunk further
445 down.
446
447 .I f
448 signals 'far' copies
449 (multiple copies have very different offsets).  See md(4) for more
450 detail about 'near' and 'far'.
451
452 The number is the number of copies of each datablock.  2 is normal, 3
453 can be useful.  This number can be at most equal to the number of
454 devices in the array.  It does not need to divide evenly into that
455 number (e.g. it is perfectly legal to have an 'n2' layout for an array
456 with an odd number of devices).
457
458 .TP
459 .BR --parity=
460 same as --layout (thus explaining the p of
461 .IR -p ).
462
463 .TP
464 .BR -b ", " --bitmap=
465 Specify a file to store a write-intent bitmap in.  The file should not
466 exist unless --force is also given.  The same file should be provided
467 when assembling the array.  If the word
468 .B internal
469 is given, then the bitmap is stored with the metadata on the array,
470 and so is replicated on all devices.  If the word
471 .B none
472 is given with
473 .B --grow
474 mode, then any bitmap that is present is removed.
475
476 To help catch typing errors, the filename must contain at least one
477 slash ('/') if it is a real file (not 'internal' or 'none').
478
479 Note: external bitmaps are only known to work on ext2 and ext3.
480 Storing bitmap files on other filesystems may result in serious problems.
481
482 .TP
483 .BR --bitmap-chunk=
484 Set the chunksize of the bitmap. Each bit corresponds to that many
485 Kilobytes of storage.
486 When using a file based bitmap, the default is to use the smallest
487 size that is atleast 4 and requires no more than 2^21 chunks.
488 When using an
489 .B internal
490 bitmap, the chunksize is automatically determined to make best use of
491 available space.
492
493
494 .TP
495 .BR -W ", " --write-mostly
496 subsequent devices lists in a
497 .BR --build ,
498 .BR --create ,
499 or
500 .B --add
501 command will be flagged as 'write-mostly'.  This is valid for RAID1
502 only and means that the 'md' driver will avoid reading from these
503 devices if at all possible.  This can be useful if mirroring over a
504 slow link.
505
506 .TP
507 .BR --write-behind=
508 Specify that write-behind mode should be enabled (valid for RAID1
509 only). If an argument is specified, it will set the maximum number
510 of outstanding writes allowed. The default value is 256.
511 A write-intent bitmap is required in order to use write-behind
512 mode, and write-behind is only attempted on drives marked as
513 .IR write-mostly .
514
515 .TP
516 .BR --assume-clean
517 Tell
518 .I mdadm
519 that the array pre-existed and is known to be clean.  It can be useful
520 when trying to recover from a major failure as you can be sure that no
521 data will be affected unless you actually write to the array.  It can
522 also be used when creating a RAID1 or RAID10 if you want to avoid the
523 initial resync, however this practice - while normally safe - is not
524 recommended.   Use this ony if you really know what you are doing.
525
526 .TP
527 .BR --backup-file=
528 This is needed when --grow is used to increase the number of
529 raid-devices in a RAID5 if there  are no spare devices available.
530 See the section below on RAID_DEVICE CHANGES.  The file should be
531 stored on a separate device, not on the raid array being reshaped.
532
533 .TP
534 .BR -N ", " --name=
535 Set a
536 .B name
537 for the array.  This is currently only effective when creating an
538 array with a version-1 superblock.  The name is a simple textual
539 string that can be used to identify array components when assembling.
540
541 .TP
542 .BR -R ", " --run
543 Insist that
544 .I mdadm
545 run the array, even if some of the components
546 appear to be active in another array or filesystem.  Normally
547 .I mdadm
548 will ask for confirmation before including such components in an
549 array.  This option causes that question to be suppressed.
550
551 .TP
552 .BR -f ", " --force
553 Insist that
554 .I mdadm
555 accept the geometry and layout specified without question.  Normally
556 .I mdadm
557 will not allow creation of an array with only one device, and will try
558 to create a raid5 array with one missing drive (as this makes the
559 initial resync work faster).  With
560 .BR --force ,
561 .I mdadm
562 will not try to be so clever.
563
564 .TP
565 .BR -a ", " "--auto{=no,yes,md,mdp,part,p}{NN}"
566 Instruct mdadm to create the device file if needed, possibly allocating
567 an unused minor number.  "md" causes a non-partitionable array
568 to be used.  "mdp", "part" or "p" causes a partitionable array (2.6 and
569 later) to be used.  "yes" requires the named md device to have
570 a 'standard' format, and the type and minor number will be determined
571 from this.  See DEVICE NAMES below.
572
573 The argument can also come immediately after
574 "-a".  e.g. "-ap".
575
576 If --auto is not given on the command line or in the config file, then
577 the default will be
578 .BR --auto=yes .
579
580 If
581 .I --scan
582 is also given, then any
583 .I auto=
584 entries in the config file will over-ride the
585 .I --auto
586 instruction given on the command line.
587
588 For partitionable arrays,
589 .I mdadm
590 will create the device file for the whole array and for the first 4
591 partitions.  A different number of partitions can be specified at the
592 end of this option (e.g.
593 .BR --auto=p7 ).
594 If the device name ends with a digit, the partition names add a 'p',
595 and a number, e.g. "/dev/home1p3".  If there is no
596 trailing digit, then the partition names just have a number added,
597 e.g. "/dev/scratch3".
598
599 If the md device name is in a 'standard' format as described in DEVICE
600 NAMES, then it will be created, if necessary, with the appropriate
601 number based on that name.  If the device name is not in one of these
602 formats, then a unused minor number will be allocated.  The minor
603 number will be considered unused if there is no active array for that
604 number, and there is no entry in /dev for that number and with a
605 non-standard name.
606
607 .TP
608 .BR --symlink = no
609 Normally when
610 .B --auto
611 causes
612 .I mdadm
613 to create devices in
614 .B /dev/md/
615 it will also create symlinks from
616 .B /dev/
617 with names starting with
618 .B md
619 or
620 .BR md_ .
621 Use
622 .B --symlink=no
623 to suppress this, or
624 .B --symlink=yes
625 to enforce this even if it is suppressing
626 .IR mdadm.conf .
627
628
629 .SH For assemble:
630
631 .TP
632 .BR -u ", " --uuid=
633 uuid of array to assemble. Devices which don't have this uuid are
634 excluded
635
636 .TP
637 .BR -m ", " --super-minor=
638 Minor number of device that array was created for.  Devices which
639 don't have this minor number are excluded.  If you create an array as
640 /dev/md1, then all superblocks will contain the minor number 1, even if
641 the array is later assembled as /dev/md2.
642
643 Giving the literal word "dev" for
644 .B --super-minor
645 will cause
646 .I mdadm
647 to use the minor number of the md device that is being assembled.
648 e.g. when assembling
649 .BR /dev/md0 ,
650 .M --super-minor=dev
651 will look for super blocks with a minor number of 0.
652
653 .TP
654 .BR -N ", " --name=
655 Specify the name of the array to assemble.  This must be the name
656 that was specified when creating the array.  It must either match
657 then name stored in the superblock exactly, or it must match
658 with the current
659 .I homehost
660 is added to the start of the given name.
661
662 .TP
663 .BR -f ", " --force
664 Assemble the array even if some superblocks appear out-of-date
665
666 .TP
667 .BR -R ", " --run
668 Attempt to start the array even if fewer drives were given than were
669 present last time the array was active.  Normally if not all the
670 expected drives are found and
671 .B --scan
672 is not used, then the array will be assembled but not started.
673 With
674 .B --run
675 an attempt will be made to start it anyway.
676
677 .TP
678 .B --no-degraded
679 This is the reverse of
680 .B --run
681 in that it inhibits the started if array unless all expected drives
682 are present.  This is only needed with
683 .B --scan
684 and can be used if you physical connections to devices are
685 not as reliable as you would like.
686
687 .TP
688 .BR -a ", " "--auto{=no,yes,md,mdp,part}"
689 See this option under Create and Build options.
690
691 .TP
692 .BR -b ", " --bitmap=
693 Specify the bitmap file that was given when the array was created.  If
694 an array has an
695 .B internal
696 bitmap, there is no need to specify this when assembling the array.
697
698 .TP
699 .BR --backup-file=
700 If
701 .B --backup-file
702 was used to grow the number of raid-devices in a RAID5, and the system
703 crashed during the critical section, then the same
704 .B --backup-file
705 must be presented to --assemble to allow possibly corrupted data to be
706 restored.
707
708 .TP
709 .BR -U ", " --update=
710 Update the superblock on each device while assembling the array.  The
711 argument given to this flag can be one of
712 .BR sparc2.2 ,
713 .BR summaries ,
714 .BR uuid ,
715 .BR name ,
716 .BR homehost ,
717 .BR resync ,
718 .BR byteorder ,
719 .BR devicesize ,
720 or
721 .BR super-minor .
722
723 The
724 .B sparc2.2
725 option will adjust the superblock of an array what was created on a Sparc
726 machine running a patched 2.2 Linux kernel.  This kernel got the
727 alignment of part of the superblock wrong.  You can use the
728 .B "--examine --sparc2.2"
729 option to
730 .I mdadm
731 to see what effect this would have.
732
733 The
734 .B super-minor
735 option will update the
736 .B "preferred minor"
737 field on each superblock to match the minor number of the array being
738 assembled.
739 This can be useful if
740 .B --examine
741 reports a different "Preferred Minor" to
742 .BR --detail .
743 In some cases this update will be performed automatically
744 by the kernel driver. In particular the update happens automatically
745 at the first write to an array with redundancy (RAID level 1 or
746 greater) on a 2.6 (or later) kernel.
747
748 The
749 .B uuid
750 option will change the uuid of the array.  If a UUID is given with the
751 "--uuid" option that UUID will be used as a new UUID and will
752 .B NOT
753 be used to help identify the devices in the array.
754 If no "--uuid" is given, a random uuid is chosen.
755
756 The
757 .B name
758 option will change the
759 .I name
760 of the array as stored in the superblock.  This is only supported for
761 version-1 superblocks.
762
763 The
764 .B homehost
765 option will change the
766 .I homehost
767 as recorded in the superblock.  For version-0 superblocks, this is the
768 same as updating the UUID.
769 For version-1 superblocks, this involves updating the name.
770
771 The
772 .B resync
773 option will cause the array to be marked
774 .I dirty
775 meaning that any redundancy in the array (e.g. parity for raid5,
776 copies for raid1) may be incorrect.  This will cause the raid system
777 to perform a "resync" pass to make sure that all redundant information
778 is correct.
779
780 The
781 .B byteorder
782 option allows arrays to be moved between machines with different
783 byte-order.
784 When assembling such an array for the first time after a move, giving
785 .B "--update=byteorder"
786 will cause
787 .I mdadm
788 to expect superblocks to have their byteorder reversed, and will
789 correct that order before assembling the array.  This is only valid
790 with original (Version 0.90) superblocks.
791
792 The
793 .B summaries
794 option will correct the summaries in the superblock. That is the
795 counts of total, working, active, failed, and spare devices.
796
797 The
798 .B devicesize
799 will rarely be of use.  It applies to version 1.1 and 1.2 metadata
800 only (where the metadata is at the start of the device) and is only
801 useful when the component device has changed size (typically become
802 larger).  The version 1 metadata records the amount of the device that
803 can be used to store data, so if a device in a version 1.1 or 1.2
804 array becomes larger, the metadata will still be visible, but the
805 extra space will not.  In this case it might be useful to assemble the
806 array with
807 .BR --update=devicesize .
808 This will cause
809 .I mdadm
810 to determine the maximum usable amount of space on each device and
811 update the relevant field in the metadata.
812
813 .TP
814 .B --auto-update-homehost
815 This flag is only meaning with auto-assembly (see discussion below).
816 In that situation, if no suitable arrays are found for this homehost,
817 .I mdadm
818 will recan for any arrays at all and will assemble them and update the
819 homehost to match the current host.
820
821 .SH For Manage mode:
822
823 .TP
824 .BR -a ", " --add
825 hot-add listed devices.
826
827 .TP
828 .BR --re-add
829 re-add a device that was recently removed from an array.
830
831 .TP
832 .BR -r ", " --remove
833 remove listed devices.  They must not be active.  i.e. they should
834 be failed or spare devices.
835
836 .TP
837 .BR -f ", " --fail
838 mark listed devices as faulty.
839
840 .TP
841 .BR --set-faulty
842 same as --fail.
843
844 .P
845 Each of these options require that the first device list is the array
846 to be acted upon and the remainder are component devices to be added,
847 removed, or marked as fault.  Several different operations can be
848 specified for different devices, e.g.
849 .in +5
850 mdadm /dev/md0 --add /dev/sda1 --fail /dev/sdb1 --remove /dev/sdb1
851 .in -5
852 Each operation applies to all devices listed until the next
853 operations.
854
855 If an array is using a write-intent bitmap, then devices which have
856 been removed can be re-added in a way that avoids a full
857 reconstruction but instead just updated the blocks that have changed
858 since the device was removed.  For arrays with persistent metadata
859 (superblocks) this is done automatically.  For arrays created with
860 .B --build
861 mdadm needs to be told that this device we removed recently with
862 .B --re-add.
863
864 Devices can only be removed from an array if they are not in active
865 use.  i.e. that must be spares or failed devices.  To remove an active
866 device, it must be marked as
867 .B faulty
868 first.
869
870 .SH For Misc mode:
871
872 .TP
873 .BR -Q ", " --query
874 Examine a device to see
875 (1) if it is an md device and (2) if it is a component of an md
876 array.
877 Information about what is discovered is presented.
878
879 .TP
880 .BR -D ", " --detail
881 Print detail of one or more md devices.
882
883 .TP
884 .BR -E ", " --examine
885 Print content of md superblock on device(s).
886 .TP
887 .B --sparc2.2
888 If an array was created on a 2.2 Linux kernel patched with RAID
889 support, the superblock will have been created incorrectly, or at
890 least incompatibly with 2.4 and later kernels.  Using the
891 .B --sparc2.2
892 flag with
893 .B --examine
894 will fix the superblock before displaying it.  If this appears to do
895 the right thing, then the array can be successfully assembled using
896 .BR "--assemble --update=sparc2.2" .
897
898 .TP
899 .BR -X ", " --examine-bitmap
900 Report information about a bitmap file.
901
902 .TP
903 .BR -R ", " --run
904 start a partially built array.
905
906 .TP
907 .BR -S ", " --stop
908 deactivate array, releasing all resources.
909
910 .TP
911 .BR -o ", " --readonly
912 mark array as readonly.
913
914 .TP
915 .BR -w ", " --readwrite
916 mark array as readwrite.
917
918 .TP
919 .B --zero-superblock
920 If the device contains a valid md superblock, the block is
921 over-written with zeros.  With
922 --force
923 the block where the superblock would be is over-written even if it
924 doesn't appear to be valid.
925
926 .TP
927 .BR -t ", " --test
928 When used with
929 .BR --detail ,
930 the exit status of
931 .I mdadm
932 is set to reflect the status of the device.
933
934 .SH For Monitor mode:
935 .TP
936 .BR -m ", " --mail
937 Give a mail address to send alerts to.
938
939 .TP
940 .BR -p ", " --program ", " --alert
941 Give a program to be run whenever an event is detected.
942
943 .TP
944 .BR -y ", " --syslog
945 Cause all events to be reported through 'syslog'.  The messages have
946 facility of 'daemon' and varying priorities.
947
948 .TP
949 .BR -d ", " --delay
950 Give a delay in seconds.
951 .B mdadm
952 polls the md arrays and then waits this many seconds before polling
953 again.  The default is 60 seconds.
954
955 .TP
956 .BR -f ", " --daemonise
957 Tell
958 .B mdadm
959 to run as a background daemon if it decides to monitor anything.  This
960 causes it to fork and run in the child, and to disconnect form the
961 terminal.  The process id of the child is written to stdout.
962 This is useful with
963 .B --scan
964 which will only continue monitoring if a mail address or alert program
965 is found in the config file.
966
967 .TP
968 .BR -i ", " --pid-file
969 When
970 .B mdadm
971 is running in daemon mode, write the pid of the daemon process to
972 the specified file, instead of printing it on standard output.
973
974 .TP
975 .BR -1 ", " --oneshot
976 Check arrays only once.  This will generate
977 .B NewArray
978 events and more significantly
979 .B DegradedArray
980 and
981 .B SparesMissing
982 events.  Running
983 .in +5
984 .B "   mdadm --monitor --scan -1"
985 .in -5
986 from a cron script will ensure regular notification of any degraded arrays.
987
988 .TP
989 .BR -t ", " --test
990 Generate a
991 .B TestMessage
992 alert for every array found at startup.  This alert gets mailed and
993 passed to the alert program.  This can be used for testing that alert
994 message do get through successfully.
995
996 .SH ASSEMBLE MODE
997
998 .HP 12
999 Usage:
1000 .B mdadm --assemble
1001 .I md-device options-and-component-devices...
1002 .HP 12
1003 Usage:
1004 .B mdadm --assemble --scan
1005 .I  md-devices-and-options...
1006 .HP 12
1007 Usage:
1008 .B mdadm --assemble --scan
1009 .I  options...
1010
1011 .PP
1012 This usage assembles one or more raid arrays from pre-existing components.
1013 For each array, mdadm needs to know the md device, the identity of the
1014 array, and a number of component-devices. These can be found in a number of ways.
1015
1016 In the first usage example (without the
1017 .BR --scan )
1018 the first device given is the md device.
1019 In the second usage example, all devices listed are treated as md
1020 devices and assembly is attempted.
1021 In the third (where no devices are listed) all md devices that are
1022 listed in the configuration file are assembled.
1023
1024 If precisely one device is listed, but
1025 .B --scan
1026 is not given, then
1027 .I mdadm
1028 acts as though
1029 .B --scan
1030 was given and identify information is extracted from the configuration file.
1031
1032 The identity can be given with the
1033 .B --uuid
1034 option, with the
1035 .B --super-minor
1036 option, can be found  in the config file, or will be taken from the
1037 super block on the first component-device listed on the command line.
1038
1039 Devices can be given on the
1040 .B --assemble
1041 command line or in the config file. Only devices which have an md
1042 superblock which contains the right identity will be considered for
1043 any array.
1044
1045 The config file is only used if explicitly named with
1046 .B --config
1047 or requested with (a possibly implicit)
1048 .B --scan.
1049 In the later case,
1050 .B /etc/mdadm.conf
1051 is used.
1052
1053 If
1054 .B --scan
1055 is not given, then the config file will only be used to find the
1056 identity of md arrays.
1057
1058 Normally the array will be started after it is assembled.  However if
1059 .B --scan
1060 is not given and insufficient drives were listed to start a complete
1061 (non-degraded) array, then the array is not started (to guard against
1062 usage errors).  To insist that the array be started in this case (as
1063 may work for RAID1, 4, 5, 6, or 10), give the
1064 .B --run
1065 flag.
1066
1067 If the md device does not exist, then it will be created providing the
1068 intent is clear. i.e. the name must be in a standard form, or the
1069 .I --auto
1070 option must be given to clarify how and whether the device should be
1071 created.
1072
1073 This can be useful for handling partitioned devices (which don't have
1074 a stable device number - it can change after a reboot) and when using
1075 "udev" to manage your
1076 .B /dev
1077 tree (udev cannot handle md devices because of the unusual device
1078 initialisation conventions).
1079
1080 If the option to "auto" is "mdp" or "part" or (on the command line
1081 only) "p", then mdadm will create a partitionable array, using the
1082 first free one that is not in use, and does not already have an entry
1083 in /dev (apart from numeric /dev/md* entries).
1084
1085 If the option to "auto" is "yes" or "md" or (on the command line)
1086 nothing, then mdadm will create a traditional, non-partitionable md
1087 array.
1088
1089 It is expected that the "auto" functionality will be used to create
1090 device entries with meaningful names such as "/dev/md/home" or
1091 "/dev/md/root", rather than names based on the numerical array number.
1092
1093 When using this option to create a partitionable array, the device
1094 files for the first 4 partitions are also created. If a different
1095 number is required it can be simply appended to the auto option.
1096 e.g. "auto=part8".  Partition names are created by appending a digit
1097 string to the device name, with an intervening "p" if the device name
1098 ends with a digit.
1099
1100 The
1101 .B --auto
1102 option is also available in Build and Create modes.  As those modes do
1103 not use a config file, the "auto=" config option does not apply to
1104 these modes.
1105
1106 .SS Auto Assembly
1107 When
1108 .B --assemble
1109 is used with
1110 .B --scan
1111 and no devices are listed,
1112 .I mdadm
1113 will first attempt to assemble all the arrays listed in the config
1114 file.
1115
1116 If a
1117 .B homehost
1118 has been specified (either in the config file or on the command line),
1119 .I mdadm
1120 will look further for possible arrays and will try to assemble
1121 anything that it finds which is tagged as belonging to the given
1122 homehost.  This is the only situation where
1123 .I mdadm
1124 will assemble arrays without being given specific device name or
1125 identify information for the array.
1126
1127 If
1128 .I mdadm
1129 finds a consistent set of devices that look like they should comprise
1130 an array, and if the superblock is tagged as belonging to the given
1131 home host, it will automatically choose a device name and try to
1132 assemble the array.  If the array uses version-0.90 metadata, then the
1133 .B minor
1134 number as recorded in the superblock is used to create a name in
1135 .B /dev/md/
1136 so for example
1137 .BR /dev/md/3 .
1138 If the array uses version-1 metadata, then the
1139 .B name
1140 from the superblock is used to similarly create a name in
1141 .BR /dev/md .
1142 The name will have any 'host' prefix stripped first.
1143
1144 If
1145 .I mdadm
1146 cannot find any array for the given host at all, and if
1147 .B --auto-update-homehost
1148 is given, then
1149 .I mdadm
1150 will search again for any array (not just an array created for this
1151 host) and will assemble each assuming
1152 .IR --update=homehost .
1153 This will change the host tag in the superblock so that on the next run,
1154 these arrays will be found without the second pass.  The intention of
1155 this feature is to support transitioning a set of md arrays to using
1156 homehost tagging.
1157
1158 The reason for requiring arrays to be tagged with the homehost for
1159 auto assembly is to guard against problems that can arise when moving
1160 devices from one host to another.
1161
1162 .SH BUILD MODE
1163
1164 .HP 12
1165 Usage:
1166 .B mdadm --build
1167 .I device
1168 .BI --chunk= X
1169 .BI --level= Y
1170 .BI --raid-devices= Z
1171 .I devices
1172
1173 .PP
1174 This usage is similar to
1175 .BR --create .
1176 The difference is that it creates an array without a superblock. With
1177 these arrays there is no difference between initially creating the array and
1178 subsequently assembling the array, except that hopefully there is useful
1179 data there in the second case.
1180
1181 The level may raid0, linear, multipath, or faulty, or one of their
1182 synonyms. All devices must be listed and the array will be started
1183 once complete.
1184
1185 .SH CREATE MODE
1186
1187 .HP 12
1188 Usage:
1189 .B mdadm --create
1190 .I device
1191 .BI --chunk= X
1192 .BI --level= Y
1193 .br
1194 .BI --raid-devices= Z
1195 .I  devices
1196
1197 .PP
1198 This usage will initialise a new md array, associate some devices with
1199 it, and activate the array.
1200
1201 If the
1202 .B --auto
1203 option is given (as described in more detail in the section on
1204 Assemble mode), then the md device will be created with a suitable
1205 device number if necessary.
1206
1207 As devices are added, they are checked to see if they contain raid
1208 superblocks or filesystems. They are also checked to see if the variance in
1209 device size exceeds 1%.
1210
1211 If any discrepancy is found, the array will not automatically be run, though
1212 the presence of a
1213 .B --run
1214 can override this caution.
1215
1216 To create a "degraded" array in which some devices are missing, simply
1217 give the word "\fBmissing\fP"
1218 in place of a device name.  This will cause
1219 .B mdadm
1220 to leave the corresponding slot in the array empty.
1221 For a RAID4 or RAID5 array at most one slot can be
1222 "\fBmissing\fP"; for a RAID6 array at most two slots.
1223 For a RAID1 array, only one real device needs to be given.  All of the
1224 others can be
1225 "\fBmissing\fP".
1226
1227 When creating a RAID5 array,
1228 .B mdadm
1229 will automatically create a degraded array with an extra spare drive.
1230 This is because building the spare into a degraded array is in general faster than resyncing
1231 the parity on a non-degraded, but not clean, array.  This feature can
1232 be over-ridden with the
1233 .I --force
1234 option.
1235
1236 When creating an array with version-1 metadata a name for the host is
1237 required.
1238 If this is not given with the
1239 .B --name
1240 option,
1241 .I mdadm
1242 will chose a name based on the last component of the name of the
1243 device being created.  So if
1244 .B /dev/md3
1245 is being created, then the name
1246 .B 3
1247 will be chosen.
1248 If
1249 .B /dev/md/home
1250 is being created, then the name
1251 .B home
1252 will be used.
1253
1254 '''If the
1255 '''.B --size
1256 '''option is given, it is not necessary to list any component-devices in this command.
1257 '''They can be added later, before a
1258 '''.B --run.
1259 '''If no
1260 '''.B --size
1261 '''is given, the apparent size of the smallest drive given is used.
1262
1263 The General Management options that are valid with --create are:
1264 .TP
1265 .B --run
1266 insist on running the array even if some devices look like they might
1267 be in use.
1268
1269 .TP
1270 .B --readonly
1271 start the array readonly - not supported yet.
1272
1273
1274 .SH MANAGE MODE
1275 .HP 12
1276 Usage:
1277 .B mdadm
1278 .I device
1279 .I options... devices...
1280 .PP
1281
1282 This usage will allow individual devices in an array to be failed,
1283 removed or added.  It is possible to perform multiple operations with
1284 on command. For example:
1285 .br
1286 .B "  mdadm /dev/md0 -f /dev/hda1 -r /dev/hda1 -a /dev/hda1"
1287 .br
1288 will firstly mark
1289 .B /dev/hda1
1290 as faulty in
1291 .B /dev/md0
1292 and will then remove it from the array and finally add it back
1293 in as a spare.  However only one md array can be affected by a single
1294 command.
1295
1296 .SH MISC MODE
1297 .HP 12
1298 Usage:
1299 .B mdadm
1300 .I options ...
1301 .I devices  ...
1302 .PP
1303
1304 MISC mode includes a number of distinct operations that
1305 operate on distinct devices.  The operations are:
1306 .TP
1307 --query
1308 The device is examined to see if it is
1309 (1) an active md array, or
1310 (2) a component of an md array.
1311 The information discovered is reported.
1312
1313 .TP
1314 --detail
1315 The device should be an active md device.
1316 .B   mdadm
1317 will display a detailed description of the array.
1318 .B --brief
1319 or
1320 .B --scan
1321 will cause the output to be less detailed and the format to be
1322 suitable for inclusion in
1323 .BR /etc/mdadm.conf .
1324 The exit status of
1325 .I mdadm
1326 will normally be 0 unless
1327 .I mdadm
1328 failed to get useful information about the device(s).  However if the
1329 .B --test
1330 option is given, then the exit status will be:
1331 .RS
1332 .TP
1333 0
1334 The array is functioning normally.
1335 .TP
1336 1
1337 The array has at least one failed device.
1338 .TP
1339 2
1340 The array has multiple failed devices and hence is unusable (raid4 or
1341 raid5).
1342 .TP
1343 4
1344 There was an error while trying to get information about the device.
1345 .RE
1346
1347 .TP
1348 --examine
1349 The device should be a component of an md array.
1350 .B mdadm
1351 will read the md superblock of the device and display the contents.
1352 If
1353 .B --brief
1354 is given, or
1355 .B --scan
1356 then multiple devices that are components of the one array
1357 are grouped together and reported in a single entry suitable
1358 for inclusion in
1359 .BR /etc/mdadm.conf .
1360
1361 Having
1362 .B --scan
1363 without listing any devices will cause all devices listed in the
1364 config file to be examined.
1365
1366 .TP
1367 --stop
1368 The devices should be active md arrays which will be deactivated, as
1369 long as they are not currently in use.
1370
1371 .TP
1372 --run
1373 This will fully activate a partially assembled md array.
1374
1375 .TP
1376 --readonly
1377 This will mark an active array as read-only, providing that it is
1378 not currently being used.
1379
1380 .TP
1381 --readwrite
1382 This will change a
1383 .B readonly
1384 array back to being read/write.
1385
1386 .TP
1387 --scan
1388 For all operations except
1389 .BR --examine ,
1390 .B --scan
1391 will cause the operation to be applied to all arrays listed in
1392 .BR /proc/mdstat .
1393 For
1394 .BR --examine,
1395 .B --scan
1396 causes all devices listed in the config file to be examined.
1397
1398
1399 .SH MONITOR MODE
1400
1401 .HP 12
1402 Usage:
1403 .B mdadm --monitor
1404 .I options... devices...
1405
1406 .PP
1407 This usage causes
1408 .B mdadm
1409 to periodically poll a number of md arrays and to report on any events
1410 noticed.
1411 .B mdadm
1412 will never exit once it decides that there are arrays to be checked,
1413 so it should normally be run in the background.
1414
1415 As well as reporting events,
1416 .B mdadm
1417 may move a spare drive from one array to another if they are in the
1418 same
1419 .B spare-group
1420 and if the destination array has a failed drive but no spares.
1421
1422 If any devices are listed on the command line,
1423 .B mdadm
1424 will only monitor those devices. Otherwise all arrays listed in the
1425 configuration file will be monitored.  Further, if
1426 .B --scan
1427 is given, then any other md devices that appear in
1428 .B /proc/mdstat
1429 will also be monitored.
1430
1431 The result of monitoring the arrays is the generation of events.
1432 These events are passed to a separate program (if specified) and may
1433 be mailed to a given E-mail address.
1434
1435 When passing event to program, the program is run once for each event
1436 and is given 2 or 3 command-line arguments.  The first is the
1437 name of the event (see below).  The second is the name of the
1438 md device which is affected, and the third is the name of a related
1439 device if relevant, such as a component device that has failed.
1440
1441 If
1442 .B --scan
1443 is given, then a program or an E-mail address must be specified on the
1444 command line or in the config file.  If neither are available, then
1445 .B mdadm
1446 will not monitor anything.
1447 Without
1448 .B --scan
1449 .B mdadm
1450 will continue monitoring as long as something was found to monitor.  If
1451 no program or email is given, then each event is reported to
1452 .BR stdout .
1453
1454 The different events are:
1455
1456 .RS 4
1457 .TP
1458 .B DeviceDisappeared
1459 An md array which previously was configured appears to no longer be
1460 configured. (syslog priority: Critical)
1461
1462 If
1463 .I mdadm
1464 was told to monitor an array which is RAID0 or Linear, then it will
1465 report
1466 .B DeviceDisappeared
1467 with the extra information
1468 .BR Wrong-Level .
1469 This is because RAID0 and Linear do not support the device-failed,
1470 hot-spare and resync operations which are monitored.
1471
1472 .TP
1473 .B RebuildStarted
1474 An md array started reconstruction. (syslog priority: Warning)
1475
1476 .TP
1477 .BI Rebuild NN
1478 Where
1479 .I NN
1480 is 20, 40, 60, or 80, this indicates that rebuild has passed that many
1481 percentage of the total. (syslog priority: Warning)
1482
1483 .TP
1484 .B RebuildFinished
1485 An md array that was rebuilding, isn't any more, either because it
1486 finished normally or was aborted. (syslog priority: Warning)
1487
1488 .TP
1489 .B Fail
1490 An active component device of an array has been marked as
1491 faulty. (syslog priority: Critical)
1492
1493 .TP
1494 .B FailSpare
1495 A spare component device which was being rebuilt to replace a faulty
1496 device has failed. (syslog priority: Critial)
1497
1498 .TP
1499 .B SpareActive
1500 A spare component device which was being rebuilt to replace a faulty
1501 device has been successfully rebuilt and has been made active.
1502 (syslog priority: Info)
1503
1504 .TP
1505 .B NewArray
1506 A new md array has been detected in the
1507 .B /proc/mdstat
1508 file.   (syslog priority: Info)
1509
1510 .TP
1511 .B DegradedArray
1512 A newly noticed array appears to be degraded.  This message is not
1513 generated when
1514 .I mdadm
1515 notices a drive failure which causes degradation, but only when
1516 .I mdadm
1517 notices that an array is degraded when it first sees the array.
1518 (syslog priority: Critial)
1519
1520 .TP
1521 .B MoveSpare
1522 A spare drive has been moved from one array in a
1523 .B spare-group
1524 to another to allow a failed drive to be replaced.
1525 (syslog priority: Info)
1526
1527 .TP
1528 .B SparesMissing
1529 If
1530 .I mdadm
1531 has been told, via the config file, that an array should have a certain
1532 number of spare devices, and
1533 .I mdadm
1534 detects that it has fewer that this number when it first sees the
1535 array, it will report a
1536 .B SparesMissing
1537 message.
1538 (syslog priority: Warning)
1539
1540 .TP
1541 .B TestMessage
1542 An array was found at startup, and the
1543 .B --test
1544 flag was given.
1545 (syslog priority: Info)
1546 .RE
1547
1548 Only
1549 .B Fail ,
1550 .B FailSpare ,
1551 .B DegradedArray ,
1552 .B SparesMissing ,
1553 and
1554 .B TestMessage
1555 cause Email to be sent.  All events cause the program to be run.
1556 The program is run with two or three arguments, they being the event
1557 name, the array device and possibly a second device.
1558
1559 Each event has an associated array device (e.g.
1560 .BR /dev/md1 )
1561 and possibly a second device.  For
1562 .BR Fail ,
1563 .BR FailSpare ,
1564 and
1565 .B SpareActive
1566 the second device is the relevant component device.
1567 For
1568 .B MoveSpare
1569 the second device is the array that the spare was moved from.
1570
1571 For
1572 .B mdadm
1573 to move spares from one array to another, the different arrays need to
1574 be labelled with the same
1575 .B spare-group
1576 in the configuration file.  The
1577 .B spare-group
1578 name can be any string. It is only necessary that different spare
1579 groups use different names.
1580
1581 When
1582 .B mdadm
1583 detects that an array which is in a spare group has fewer active
1584 devices than necessary for the complete array, and has no spare
1585 devices, it will look for another array in the same spare group that
1586 has a full complement of working drive and a spare.  It will then
1587 attempt to remove the spare from the second drive and add it to the
1588 first.
1589 If the removal succeeds but the adding fails, then it is added back to
1590 the original array.
1591
1592 .SH GROW MODE
1593 The GROW mode is used for changing the size or shape of an active
1594 array.
1595 For this to work, the kernel must support the necessary change.
1596 Various types of growth are being added during 2.6 development,
1597 including restructuring a raid5 array to have more active devices.
1598
1599 Currently the only support available is to
1600 .IP \(bu 4
1601 change the "size" attribute
1602 for RAID1, RAID5 and RAID6.
1603 .IP \(bu 4
1604 increase the "raid-disks" attribute of RAID1 and RAID5.
1605 .IP \(bu 4
1606 add a write-intent bitmap to any array which support these bitmaps, or
1607 remove a write-intent bitmap from such an array.
1608 .PP
1609
1610 .SS SIZE CHANGES
1611 Normally when an array is built the "size" it taken from the smallest
1612 of the drives.  If all the small drives in an arrays are, one at a
1613 time, removed and replaced with larger drives, then you could have an
1614 array of large drives with only a small amount used.  In this
1615 situation, changing the "size" with "GROW" mode will allow the extra
1616 space to start being used.  If the size is increased in this way, a
1617 "resync" process will start to make sure the new parts of the array
1618 are synchronised.
1619
1620 Note that when an array changes size, any filesystem that may be
1621 stored in the array will not automatically grow to use the space.  The
1622 filesystem will need to be explicitly told to use the extra space.
1623
1624 .SS RAID-DEVICES CHANGES
1625
1626 A RAID1 array can work with any number of devices from 1 upwards
1627 (though 1 is not very useful).  There may be times which you want to
1628 increase or decrease the number of active devices.  Note that this is
1629 different to hot-add or hot-remove which changes the number of
1630 inactive devices.
1631
1632 When reducing the number of devices in a RAID1 array, the slots which
1633 are to be removed from the array must already be vacant.  That is, the
1634 devices that which were in those slots must be failed and removed.
1635
1636 When the number of devices is increased, any hot spares that are
1637 present will be activated immediately.
1638
1639 Increasing the number of active devices in a RAID5 is much more
1640 effort.  Every block in the array will need to be read and written
1641 back to a new location.  From 2.6.17, the Linux Kernel is able to do
1642 this safely, including restart and interrupted "reshape".
1643
1644 When relocating the first few stripes on a raid5, it is not possible
1645 to keep the data on disk completely consistent and crash-proof.  To
1646 provide the required safety, mdadm disables writes to the array while
1647 this "critical section" is reshaped, and takes a backup of the data
1648 that is in that section.  This backup is normally stored in any spare
1649 devices that the array has, however it can also be stored in a
1650 separate file specified with the
1651 .B --backup-file
1652 option.  If this option is used, and the system does crash during the
1653 critical period, the same file must be passed to
1654 .B --assemble
1655 to restore the backup and reassemble the array.
1656
1657 .SS BITMAP CHANGES
1658
1659 A write-intent bitmap can be added to, or removed from, an active
1660 array.  Either internal bitmaps, or bitmaps stored in a separate file
1661 can be added.  Note that if you add a bitmap stored in a file which is
1662 in a filesystem that is on the raid array being affected, the system
1663 will deadlock.  The bitmap must be on a separate filesystem.
1664
1665 .SH EXAMPLES
1666
1667 .B "  mdadm --query /dev/name-of-device"
1668 .br
1669 This will find out if a given device is a raid array, or is part of
1670 one, and will provide brief information about the device.
1671
1672 .B "  mdadm --assemble --scan"
1673 .br
1674 This will assemble and start all arrays listed in the standard config file
1675 file.  This command will typically go in a system startup file.
1676
1677 .B "  mdadm --stop --scan"
1678 .br
1679 This will shut down all array that can be shut down (i.e. are not
1680 currently in use).  This will typically go in a system shutdown script.
1681
1682 .B "  mdadm --follow --scan --delay=120"
1683 .br
1684 If (and only if) there is an Email address or program given in the
1685 standard config file, then
1686 monitor the status of all arrays listed in that file by
1687 polling them ever 2 minutes.
1688
1689 .B "  mdadm --create /dev/md0 --level=1 --raid-devices=2 /dev/hd[ac]1"
1690 .br
1691 Create /dev/md0 as a RAID1 array consisting of /dev/hda1 and /dev/hdc1.
1692
1693 .br
1694 .B "  echo 'DEVICE /dev/hd*[0-9] /dev/sd*[0-9]' > mdadm.conf"
1695 .br
1696 .B "  mdadm --detail --scan >> mdadm.conf"
1697 .br
1698 This will create a prototype config file that describes currently
1699 active arrays that are known to be made from partitions of IDE or SCSI drives.
1700 This file should be reviewed before being used as it may
1701 contain unwanted detail.
1702
1703 .B "  echo 'DEVICE /dev/hd[a-z] /dev/sd*[a-z]' > mdadm.conf"
1704 .br
1705 .B "  mdadm --examine --scan --config=mdadm.conf >> mdadm.conf"
1706 .ber
1707 This will find what arrays could be assembled from existing IDE and
1708 SCSI whole drives (not partitions) and store the information is the
1709 format of a config file.
1710 This file is very likely to contain unwanted detail, particularly
1711 the
1712 .B devices=
1713 entries.  It should be reviewed and edited before being used as an
1714 actual config file.
1715
1716 .B "  mdadm --examine --brief --scan --config=partitions"
1717 .br
1718 .B "  mdadm -Ebsc partitions"
1719 .br
1720 Create a list of devices by reading
1721 .BR /proc/partitions ,
1722 scan these for RAID superblocks, and printout a brief listing of all
1723 that was found.
1724
1725 .B "  mdadm -Ac partitions -m 0 /dev/md0"
1726 .br
1727 Scan all partitions and devices listed in
1728 .BR /proc/partitions
1729 and assemble
1730 .B /dev/md0
1731 out of all such devices with a RAID superblock with a minor number of 0.
1732
1733 .B "  mdadm --monitor --scan --daemonise > /var/run/mdadm"
1734 .br
1735 If config file contains a mail address or alert program, run mdadm in
1736 the background in monitor mode monitoring all md devices.  Also write
1737 pid of mdadm daemon to
1738 .BR /var/run/mdadm .
1739
1740 .B "  mdadm --create --help"
1741 .br
1742 Provide help about the Create mode.
1743
1744 .B "  mdadm --config --help"
1745 .br
1746 Provide help about the format of the config file.
1747
1748 .B "  mdadm --help"
1749 .br
1750 Provide general help.
1751
1752
1753 .SH FILES
1754
1755 .SS /proc/mdstat
1756
1757 If you're using the
1758 .B /proc
1759 filesystem,
1760 .B /proc/mdstat
1761 lists all active md devices with information about them.
1762 .B mdadm
1763 uses this to find arrays when
1764 .B --scan
1765 is given in Misc mode, and to monitor array reconstruction
1766 on Monitor mode.
1767
1768
1769 .SS /etc/mdadm.conf
1770
1771 The config file lists which devices may be scanned to see if
1772 they contain MD super block, and gives identifying information
1773 (e.g. UUID) about known MD arrays.  See
1774 .BR mdadm.conf (5)
1775 for more details.
1776
1777 .SH DEVICE NAMES
1778
1779 While entries in the /dev directory can have any format you like,
1780 .I mdadm
1781 has an understanding of 'standard' formats which it uses to guide its
1782 behaviour when creating device files via the
1783 .I --auto
1784 option.
1785
1786 The standard names for non-partitioned arrays (the only sort of md
1787 array available in 2.4 and earlier) either of
1788 .IP
1789 /dev/mdNN
1790 .br
1791 /dev/md/NN
1792 .PP
1793 where NN is a number.
1794 The standard names for partitionable arrays (as available from 2.6
1795 onwards) is one of
1796 .IP
1797 /dev/md/dNN
1798 .br
1799 /dev/md_dNN
1800 .PP
1801 Partition numbers should be indicated by added "pMM" to these, thus "/dev/md/d1p2".
1802
1803 .SH NOTE
1804 .B mdadm
1805 was previously known as
1806 .BR mdctl .
1807 .P
1808 .B mdadm
1809 is completely separate from the
1810 .B raidtools
1811 package, and does not use the
1812 .I /etc/raidtab
1813 configuration file at all.
1814
1815 .SH SEE ALSO
1816 For information on the various levels of
1817 RAID, check out:
1818
1819 .IP
1820 .UR   http://ostenfeld.dk/~jakob/Software-RAID.HOWTO/
1821 http://ostenfeld.dk/~jakob/Software-RAID.HOWTO/
1822 .UE
1823 '''.PP
1824 '''for new releases of the RAID driver check out:
1825 '''
1826 '''.IP
1827 '''.UR  ftp://ftp.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/people/mingo/raid-patches
1828 '''ftp://ftp.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/people/mingo/raid-patches
1829 '''.UE
1830 '''.PP
1831 '''or
1832 '''.IP
1833 '''.UR http://www.cse.unsw.edu.au/~neilb/patches/linux-stable/
1834 '''http://www.cse.unsw.edu.au/~neilb/patches/linux-stable/
1835 '''.UE
1836 .PP
1837 The latest version of
1838 .I mdadm
1839 should always be available from
1840 .IP
1841 .UR http://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/utils/raid/mdadm/
1842 http://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/utils/raid/mdadm/
1843 .UE
1844 .PP
1845 .IR mdadm.conf (5),
1846 .IR md (4).
1847 .PP
1848 .IR raidtab (5),
1849 .IR raid0run (8),
1850 .IR raidstop (8),
1851 .IR mkraid (8).